Many people believe the best way to improve at public speaking is to learn through experience. We won’t argue with that too much here at Proof Management HQ, but we also like to use wisdom from accomplished presenters to help enhance our own speaking skills.

Renowned author Seth Godin stated, “You are not being judged; the value of what you are bringing to the audience is being judged.” This is a key distinction that has helped us go into every Proof Management speech with more confidence. By focusing on the quality of our messages, we (mostly) eliminate the anxiety so many people experience when they’re at the podium.

Leadership expert John C. Maxwell explained our theory of presenting when he said, “The first time you say something, it’s heard; the second time, it’s recognized; the third time, it’s learned.” When we’re organizing our remarks before giving a presentation, we keep these simple but essential words of wisdom in mind.

Motivational speaker Patricia Fripp hit on one of our fundamental speaking philosophies when she said, “The first 30 seconds and the last 30 seconds have the most impact in a presentation.” We aim to craft memorable introductions for all our speeches, but we’re careful to end on a high note that reaffirms our most important points.

We return to these quotes whenever we need to prepare for a big presentation.

Many people believe the best way to improve at public speaking is to learn through experience. We won’t argue with that too much here at Proof Management HQ, but we also like to use wisdom from accomplished presenters to help enhance our own speaking skills.

Renowned author Seth Godin stated, “You are not being judged; the value of what you are bringing to the audience is being judged.” This is a key distinction that has helped us go into every Proof Management speech with more confidence. By focusing on the quality of our messages, we (mostly) eliminate the anxiety so many people experience when they’re at the podium.

Leadership expert John C. Maxwell explained our theory of presenting when he said, “The first time you say something, it’s heard; the second time, it’s recognized; the third time, it’s learned.” When we’re organizing our remarks before giving a presentation, we keep these simple but essential words of wisdom in mind.

Motivational speaker Patricia Fripp hit on one of our fundamental speaking philosophies when she said, “The first 30 seconds and the last 30 seconds have the most impact in a presentation.” We aim to craft memorable introductions for all our speeches, but we’re careful to end on a high note that reaffirms our most important points.

We return to these quotes whenever we need to prepare for a big presentation.